Category Archives: Dashboard Design

Download the Power BI Architecture Diagram

Update: I’ve updated the Power BI architecture diagram! Click here to view version 2! 

As a Data Platform Solution Architect for Microsoft, one of my jobs is to help teach my customers what our amazing tools can do and how those tools work. Interest in Power BI is blowing up and I’m seeing most of my customers express huge interest in this awesome tool. To help facilitate the conversation about how Power BI works and how it can help my customers, I put together this diagram.

Also, each text block in the black area to the right includes a link to the documentation on PowerBI.com for the specific component. So if I’m looking at the diagram and I want to gather more information on the Power BI Gateway – Enterprise, just click the text block or point #2. Continue reading Download the Power BI Architecture Diagram

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5 Tips for #PowerBI

After a couple months of fun with Power BI, I’ve picked up a few little tricks along the way that have helped me to be able to create some pretty cool data visualizations and dashboard reports. Here are five Power BI tips and tricks that you may find useful as you begin creating dashboards for your organization.

New to Power BI? Start here to get acquainted!

1) Use a pie chart or donut chart as a KPI

One of the ways we can create a KPI visualization is to use a pie or donut chart visualization, which you can see here.

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In the chart above, I create a KPI to quickly display which tight ends score more than, less than or equal to the average number of touchdowns all tight ends scored last year allowing me to quickly identify tight ends that score more TDs than average.

Here is my calculated column to create the KPI value for you to have as an example:

TD KPI = if(int('TE Stats'[TD])>INT('TE Stats'[Avg TE TDs]),"1",IF(int('TE Stats'[TD])<int('TE Stats'[Avg TE TDs]),"-1","0"))

 

Then configure a pie chart as follows.

First, I place my KPI calculated column as the Legend and as the Values.

Power BI KPI pie chart

Then I hid all the labels and configured the colors to display red (-1), yellow(0) or green(1) depending on the value of the KPI.

Power BI KPI pie chart

Now when I use a slicer to select a player, my pie chart acts as a stoplight KPI. Cool!

Power BI KPI

2) Use a chart as a slicer

I’ve previously blogged this tip before, but this one is too nifty to not share again, in my humble opinion. One of the advantages to using a visualization like a funnel chart as a slicer is you gain the ability to single-select a filter, which is something the current slicer lacks. Check out this post to learn more about leveraging Power BI’s natural cross filtering to create some pretty cool slicers.

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3) Create a spark line with a line chart

A nice way to create a small trend line, also called a spark line, is to use a line chart visualization which you can see below.

Power BI sparkline line chart

This trick is pretty easy. Just create a normal line chart visualization, hide all the labels and shrink the chart down to the desired size.

4) Use a scatter graph and matrix to create a calendar chart with day labels

Last week you may have seen my blog post on how to use a scatter graph to create a calendar chart. One of the ways you can improve the calendar scatter graph is to create the visualization along side a matrix visualization, as seen below.

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You can use the matrix to display the names of the week below each day in the calendar and then also optionally display the totals by day.

5) Right align the y-axis on a bar chart to prevent the labels from hiding

The bar chart is a great visualization type to use in your Power BI dashboard because its so easy to differentiate the differences between the categories. But one of the problems with the visualization in Power BI is that sometimes its hard to see the categories on the y-axis if the chart is too small. See the image below to see an example the issue I’m talking about.

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One way you can work around this is to right-align the y-axis. This will cause the full value of the y-axis categories to always be displayed in all their glory albeit on the right side.

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You just have to live with the category labels on the right side of the bar chart.

Resources

Need more Power BI tips? Check out these tips:

Here’s three Power BI best practices to follow.

Here are the new visualization types in Power BI.

Converting Power Pivot models to Power BI is now a thing!

Twitter Analysis with #PowerBI & Plus One

Earlier this week Christopher Finlan put together this awesome Datazen dashboard using Plus One. Christopher has been doing a lot of cool things with Datazen so I recommend that you do like I did and subscribe to his blog. But Christopher’s cool work with Plus One inspired me to create my own Social Media dashboard using Plus One, as well.

powerbi search completePlus One has created this nifty little desktop application that you can download and install on your computer. Once you’ve set the app up, all you need to do is enter a search query. In my case, I wanted to see what people were doing and saying with Power BI on Twitter. Plus One can only recover the previous seven days of data, so you’ll need to periodically refresh your search or schedule the search, which you can do easily with the Plus One application. Continue reading Twitter Analysis with #PowerBI & Plus One

#PowerBI Tip: Use the Treemap, Column or Funnel Chart as a Colorful Slicer

Power BI Desktop has been out for GA for over a week now and some of the pro’s out there have come up with some pretty cool tricks. For instance:

But if you’re looking for a way to spice up you report filtering with a little color, try using the Treemap, Column or Funnel chart as a Slicer for those fields that only contain a few unique values. At this point with Power BI, you don’t have any customization options for the Slicer visualization (although I’m sure that is coming down the pipe in a future release). This option won’t work terribly well if the field you would like to use as a slicer has more than a dozen or so unique members, but you can experiment with it and see what you can come up with. Here’s my custom slicers in action.

column chart as slicer

tree map slice in action

Power BI Funnel slicer in action

To multi-select tiles in the custom slicer, just hold Cntrl as you click.

This little trick relies on the natural cross filtering between data regions in the Power BI dashboards. First I created a measure that calculates the distinct count of the field that I wish to use as my slicer. In this case the field is Genre.

Power BI Distinct Count DAX calculation

Then I added a Treemap/Funnel chart to the report using the field Genre as the Group value and the measure Distinct Count Genre as the Values.

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Then just resize the visualization so that the squares are about evenly sized. There’s a few ways you can arrange it, but just play around with it and see what you can come up with.

Power BI Dashboard with Treemap Slicer

Power BI Dashboard with Treemap Slicer

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Funnel slicer

If you are wondering how I made the column chart slicer, here’s a gif image that shows the steps I used. Enjoy!

Power BI column chart as slicer making of

Feedback?

What do you think? Leave me a comment below and let me know. Or if you’ve got a neat Power BI trick you’d like to share, let me know, as well. I love to hear new ideas! Thanks for reading!

#PowerBI Fantasy Football Player Stats Dashboards for Download

Every year at Pragmatic Works some coworkers, including consultants, marketing staff, support team members, software development staff and project management, partake in a company fantasy football league. And with the recent release of the new Power BI Desktop, I thought what better way is there to prepare to completely annihilate my coworkers and friends in an imaginary nonsensical game than by creating some nifty Power BI dashboards based on last years player stats as recorded by Yahoo! Sports. So I thought I’d walk you through some of the steps I followed to leverage the Yahoo! Sports NFL player stats page as a data source and some of the query transformations I applied to prepare the data for reporting.

Power BI dashboard with Power BI Desktop Continue reading #PowerBI Fantasy Football Player Stats Dashboards for Download

Three Best Practices for #PowerBI

Since the release of Power BI Desktop this past week, I’ve been really spending my extra time digging into the application focusing on learning and experimenting as much as I can. When my wife has been watching Law and Order: SVU reruns at night after the rug rats are in bed, I’ve been right there next to her designing Power BI dashboards like the total data nerd that I am. When my kids have been taking their naps during the weekend, I’ve been writing calculations in the model for my test dashboards. Or when I’ve been riding in the car back and forth to work I’ve been thinking of new things to do with Power BI Desktop.

Since I’ve been spending a decent amount of time with Power BI Desktop, I thought I’d take a moment to share three things to know and remember when designing your Power BI models and dashboards that I think will help you make the most of this tool and be effective at providing the data your business needs to succeed.

1. Optimize your Power BI Semantic Model

It probably hasn’t taken you long to figure this one out if you’ve built Power Pivot/Tabular models or at least it won’t when you do start developing Power BI dashboards. The visualizations in Power BI and Power View are heavily meta-data driven which means that column names, table or query names, formatting and more are surfaced to the user in the dashboard. So if you using a really whacky naming convention in your data warehouse for your tables like “dim_Product_scd2_v2” and the column names aren’t much better, these naming conventions are going to be shown to the users in the report visualizations and field list.

For example, take a look at the following report.

Power BI Dashboard without formatting

Notice anything wonky about it? Check the field names, report titles and number formatting. Not very pretty, is it? Now take a look at this report.

Power BI Dashboard with formatting

See the difference a little cleaned up metadata makes? All I did was spend a few minutes giving the fields user-friendly name and formatting the data types. This obviously makes a huge difference in the way the dashboard appears to the users. By the way, I should get into the movie production business. 😉

My point is that the names of columns, formatting, data types, data categories and relationships are all super important to creating clean, meaningful and user friendly dashboards. The importance of a well-defined semantic model cannot be understated in my opinion. A good rule of thumb is to spend 80% to 90% of your time on the data model (besides, designing the reports is the easy part).

I’d also like the mention the importance of the relationships between the objects in the semantic model. Chance are you will have a small group of power users that will want to design their own dashboards to meet their job’s requirements and that’s one of the beauties of Power BI. But when users began developing reports, they may query your model in unexpected ways that will generate unexpected behaviors and results. I only want to mention this because the relationships between the objects in the model will impact the results your users will see in their reports. Double check your relationships and ensure that they are correct, especially after you add new objects to the model since the Power BI Desktop will sometimes make an incorrect guess at creating the relationship.

2. Choose the Right Visualizations

The best dashboards are those that tell a clear story within seconds. Your data should tell a story that is easy to read and can communicate the tale of the data to the users without a lot of extra work on their part. If your users have to look at the report for a long time in an attempt to decipher the visualizations plastered across their screen, chances are they won’t want to use your dashboard.

Let’s look at two different charts that I think will illustrate my point on the importance of choosing the right visualization for the story. The chart below shows a comparison of Domestic Sales and International Sales for different movie genres. If the purpose of this chart is to determine from which market most of the money comes from for the various film genres, then this chart isn’t doing that great of a job because we can’t clearly see the difference between the markets for Westerns.

Power BI line chart

Is there a better way to tell the data’s story? What about the pie/donut chart?

Power BI donut chart

Goodness, no. Stay away from pie and donut charts. The problem with pie/donut charts is that even with only a few categories it can be very difficult to compare the slices in the pie. And if the purpose of our dashboard is for the users to quickly gain insights into the successes and failures of the business, I recommend you stay away from the pie/donut charts.

Power BI clustered bar chart

Now that’s what I’m talking about! With a clustered bar chart, we can clearly see from which markets most of the money comes from the different genres. This is a much better visualization choice for the data. We don’t have to stare and squint in order to determine the differences between the bars.

Visualization choice is critical with designing an effective and useful dashboard, so always make sure you choose the best visualization for the job.

3. Remember the User!

We as developers can oftentimes find ourselves lost in the minutia of data processing times, ETL performance, writing code, documenting the solution and all the other things that go along with designing and building a business intelligence solution. In the midst of all that awesome and glorious development work, it can be easy to forget that the whole purpose of this solution is to make the user’s job easier, faster, better, etc.

I only mention this because too many times I’ve encountered solutions that did not make the user’s job easier. Users are crafty and resourceful people. They’re (mostly) good at their job and will find a way to do their job without having to use your crappy dashboards and reports that are confusing and difficult to use. And once you start down the path of having your users work around your solution instead of with your solution, your solution has failed because at that point its not a solution; It’s an impediment.

Meet with the users as frequently as necessary to constantly gather feedback. During the requirements gathering phase its important to ask lots of questions especially if you’re unfamiliar with the data. And once its time to start designing reports, you may meet with the users even as frequently as daily since this will be the user’s primary way to interact with your solution. I’ve been on projects where my team and I worked in a conference room with a few power users. This was excellent as we were able to get immediate feedback on any reports developed and make the required changes as desired.

Wrap Up

So in a nutshell, here are my three best practices for designing and building a killer Power BI reporting solution:

  1. Optimize the data-model by doing the following:
    1. Set data types correctly
    2. Apply user-friendly formatting to the data including explicit measures.
    3. Rename fields, measures, and tables with user-friendly naming conventions.
    4. Validate relationships between tables are created correctly.
  2. Use the right visualization that communicates the story of the data as clearly as possible.
  3. Remember the user and their experience with your solution! If the user likes to use your solution then its a success!

 

More Resources

Here’s a few more Power BI related resources you may find useful:

Check out the new visualization types in the latest release of Power BI

Learn about Power BI Desktop in this video walkthrough
Learn Power BI Desktop with Dustin Ryan

Feedback?

So what do you think? What best practices did I leave out that you thought I should have included in this list? Leave a comment down below and let me know! And as always, thanks for reading. 🙂